Theater

LTMO under the conductor Freddie Tapner have followed up their wonderful concert version of Camelot at the London Palladium in October with a three performance concert version of Howard Goodall's Girlfriends at the Bishopgate Institute, where they are the resident orchestra. If you missed it you can buy a cast recording CD soon. Unlike Camelot where so many of the songs are well known, the music of Girlfriends written in 1985 are not as familiar and listening to the CD would certainly have helped get into the concert quicker. However once the characters and their relationships are established, we settled back to enjoy the melodic tunes and fine performances of the star studded ensemble of singers.Goodall based the story on one woman's memoirs of life in the Woman Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF); women who answered the call to join up as the men went to war. 150,000 signed up in 1941 and fulfilled a range of roles including packing the parachutes and air traffic controllers for the pilots. This is given extra poignancy by the concert narration of Group Captain Victoria Gosling, one of the highest ranking women in the RAF, who gives contextual background linked to the musical story line as well as recalling her own grandfather who was killed on his 40th mission. The story focuses on six of these women, how they adapted to the life and their relationships with the pilots. The most interesting character is Jasmine sung by Vikki Stone who expresses concern over the bombing raids on Germany after her own home town Glasgow is bombed and finds herself at odds with her fellow WAAF's and the stern Commanding Officer, Woods, played by Lizzie Wofford. In her solo song "Wake me o wake me" she powerfully and emotionally mourns the death of her brother in a convoy and then leads the company in "Flying up there" where she questions whether bombing ever achieves its aim and regrets that innocent people die.Bronte Barbe, who was wonderful as Carole King in the Beautiful tour, plays Jane and her solo number "The Chances are" is one of the best songs of the first half. Natasha Barnes who took over from Sheridan Smith in Funny Girl in West End, has great fun as Sally especially in "a bit like Errol Flynn" with Jasmine, Lou and Amy and in "We dance on" with Gareth (Chris McGuigan). Lou (Lucie Jones, Elle in legally Blonde tour) and Amy (Lauren Samuels, Jules in Bend it like Beckham) are rivals for the attention of Guy (Rob Houchen).However the concert is at its best when they sing together as a WAAF chorus asin the opening number "Jump" when they join up and feel like they are treated like cattle and in the very strong Act 1 finale where they sing of the risks pilots take and the heart break that results. Act 2 opens with the excellent up beat song "Uniform" where they sing of bursting with pride and doing their bit but it not being what we dreamed of. They work well together, sound lovely and create the spirit of the time with a minimum of effort.LTMO showcasing of Girlfriends was a very enjoyable concert and will produce a very listenable CD but more than that calls for a full stage revival where we can see the characters develop fully and appreciate the quality of Goodall's music and lyrics to the full effect.Review by Nick Wayne Rating: ★★★★Seat: Stalls Row G
November 03, 2018
Set largely in the cluttered attic of writer Hans Christian Andersen, this 90 minute world premiere by Martin McDonagh has split opinion of audiences at the Bridge; and it’s clear to see why.On the one hand the cast are good with Jim Broadbent and Phil Daniels giving strong performances as Anderson and Dickens respectively. Newcomer Johnetta Eula’Mae Ackles also shines as captive ghost writer Majory in this, her professional debut. The first scene between Anderson and Charles Dickens (repeatedly referred to as Charles Darwin) is a comedic highlight and Jim Broadbent really does carry this show.The set design by Anna Fleischle is exquisite; full of intrigue and intricacies and gave hope to a play really creating a world and setting. In truth though, the design seemed a complete waste and the utter mess of the script really let the design and actors down.With the writing, there was no clear time or place both in the story or language used and this really jarred with the design and costume. There was nothing clever or sophisticated about the text or the direction and all the elements of the production felt very disjointed.Looking to the production list and there’s an exhaustive list of credits but little to show for it on stage. For instance, there are 2 Fight Directors listed but little to no fighting. The on stage death of Press Man was so lacklustre and flimsy that this didn’t look rehearsed let alone directed. A Video Associate is credited and the efforts are shown on stage in the form of a projection of fireworks in one scene. Perhaps the too many cooksmantra has taken focus away from the writing or Matthew Dunster’s direction?There are some funny moments scattered through the text and these are well delivered by the cast, with Broadbent in particular enjoying the role of Hans, but all too often the jokes rely on shock of bad language with even the kids dropping swear words throughout. One couple left after an hour and a solo audience member boo’d during the finale –a theatre first for this reviewer! This was a production which missed the mark and didn’t deliver on expectation and is a text which, I suspect, will not be performed again. It’s a production given the green light because of McDonagh’s previous work not the quality of this text. It was a frustrating, bewildering and disappointing production which offered so much visually at the start but there was no cohesion between any of the elements. Drivel.Review by Andy Edmeads Rating: ★
October 31, 2018
The producers have set out to create a worthy educational play aimed at the pre-teens market and staged in the Natural History Museum Jerwood Gallery to add to its authenticity and reinforce its serious intent. What they have delivered is a charming beautifully staged retelling of the young Charles Darwin five year voyage of discovery on board the HMS Beagle in 1831 in which he finds his purpose in life . It is full of clever creative ideas to bring to life the places and creatures he meets as the ship circumnavigates the world.The projections on the screen above the stage are delightful, building up like sketches in his notebook and coloured in as if watercolours to set the scenes but also artful incorporating animation that brings the scene to life. We see the waves of the seas they cross and the volcanoes of the lands they visit. In a five year voyage they visit a lot of places and if anything we could see more of some of the places and his discoveries.The creatures we meet are puppets operated by the actors to create their movement. These wooden framed creatures without skin nevertheless come to life especially the amazing armadillo, friendly iguana and giant turtle. We also see butterflies and birds swooping across the set and schools of fish and whales in the sea. More than that the narrative starts to sketch out his thoughts on an evolutionary process and the survival of the fittest in a way that we can understand and see.The ship itself is half of a large revolve that dominates the purpose built stage and doubles as his Cambridge college and his father's home. The other side is the rocks he clambers across in the exploration. It inevitably means some compromises in the setting and a little imagination from the audience to visualise the location and the rapid scenes changes means the revolve is almost constantly spinning slowly round. Charles Darwin at twenty two is played with an easy charm by Bradley Fosterand he conveys the man's transition from nerdy Cambridge undergraduate obsessed with Beetles to an admired fresh thinker on the verge of a brilliant new theory. He also explores his relationship with his rather unbending father (Ian Houghton), his fiancé Emma Wedgwood, an anti slavery campaigner (Melissa Vaughan) and the Beagle's Captain Fitzroy (Jack Parry-Jones) so that on his return home we are touched by the way the relationships have changed. Along the way the play touches inevitably on the clash between Christian beliefs of the Creation versus Darwin's evolving theories and on the discovery of a photographic process by John Herschel in South Africa reinforcing the story tellers educational intent. David Horton (who wrote and directed), Nick Paine and Aaron Barton have created a wonderfully imaginative story telling play that should inspire young people to care about the world and each other and dream of making a difference.Review by Nick Wayne Rating: ★★★Seat: Row k | Price of Ticket: £19.50
October 30, 2018
With One Look’ is Gregory Hazels one man show as his drag character, Vivienne De Vil. The show is set in her living room and as the evening goes on we hear all her stories about her friends (some of the most famous Broadway divas) and Vivienne takes us on a journey to look back at some of the greatest female musical theatre numbers and greats of our time. This show is truly a celebration of these fabulous women who have shaped and moulded what it is to be a Broadway star. From Judy Garland to Lea Salonga, we go through a huge repertoire of songs filled with interesting stories about each and every superstar. This is every stageys dream, a glamorous drag queen and some of the campest and best musical theatre numbers? You’ve certainly sold me!As Vivienne De Vil, Gregory Hazel provides stunning vocals and has a presence that would make any Broadway Diva shiver in her stilettos. He knows his character inside out and from the moment Vivienne walks on stage you know you’re in safe hands for the evening.The band, led by Henry Brennan, were fabulous. They managed to make it feel intimate and classy but this wouldn’t be out of place of a much larger stage without any adjusting. The compositions were beautiful, especially the mix of ‘I’d Give My Life For You’ and ‘On My Own’. That was one of the best moments in the show and when the show gets more of a run, which it should, I’d love to see more of these creative touches that really make it unique and special. The only thing I feel that was missing from this was the connection with the audience; yes of course Hazel had us all on his side and we’d all fallen in love with De Vil by the end, but it was the tiny mistakes and comments that made it more real, witty and comfortable. First night nerves could have meant this was lacking some what but when we got those elements of personality from the performance, that was when Vivienne became a true star. I must give it to Gregory Hazel however, packing in all those facts and information whilst still trying to maintain the character was so well balanced and very impressive. This show is a true celebration of the greatest women in our industry and the challenges they’ve faced in their career. Hazel manages to bring the classic Hollywood style into the modern world and with this show, its beautiful mix. Review by Mark SwaleRating: ★★★★Seat: Unreserved | Price of Ticket: £15
October 26, 2018
The Royal Shakespeare Company’s Matilda The Musical has released new production images featuring the previously announced new cast of the multi-award winning show, which is now playing its eighth year in the West End having opened at the Cambridge Theatre seven years ago today on 25 October 2011. Hayden Tee stars as Miss Trunchbull alongside Rob Compton and Holly Dale Spencer as Mr and Mrs Wormwood, and Gina Beckwho joined the company Miss Honey in 2017. Isobel Hubble and Francesca McKeown have joined Sara Munday and Olivia Wellsin sharing the title role of Matilda. The London production of Matilda The Musical is booking until 20 October 2019 whilst the UK and Ireland Tour will be playing in cities across the country until 17 August 2019. For more information see .Matilda The Musical is written by Dennis Kelly, with music and lyrics by Tim Minchin, developed and directed by Matthew Warchus. The production is designed by Rob Howell, with choreography by Peter Darling, orchestrations, additional music and musical supervision by Christopher Nightingale, lighting by Hugh Vanstone, sound by Simon Baker and the special effects and illusions are by Paul Kieve.The full adult cast includes Alex Louize Bird, Gina Beck, Rob Compton, Holly Dale Spencer, Jaye Elster, Glen Facey, Alex Hammond, Peter Houston, Jessica Joslin, Bethany Kate, Sammy Kelly, Ben Kerr, Bryan Mottram, Malinda Parris, James Revell, Gemma Scholes, Simon Shorten, Hayden Tee, Callum Train and Robert Tregoning. The young performers who play the roles of Bruce, Lavender, Amanda and the rest of the pupils at Crunchem Hall are as follows: Lois Abercrombie, Jacob Bland, Tom Brown, Emilia Bosi, Toby Brandon, Mia Byers, Quincy Miller-Cole, Lottie Cook, Imogen Darwen, Darmani Eboji, Asher Ezequiel, Jimmy Fordham Reed, Clara Freeman Alves, Stella Haden, Jobe Hart, Noah Leggott, Archie Lewis, Sadie Victoria Lim, Henry Littell, Austen Phelan, Marley Quinlan-Gardner, Daisy Statham, Cherry Vaughn-White, Sam Winser and Rochelle Wyatt.
October 25, 2018
As November approaches the final preparations are under way for Pantomime across the country with the first show opening on 10th November at the Oldham Coliseum Theatre with Cinderella and running at some venues like the Theatre Royal York until 2nd February 2019, and the anticipation grows for this fantastic family festive entertainment. It once again promises to be another brilliant season with the return of old favourites and some wonderful big names being signed up for their first Pantomimes ( hope there are ready for 50 plus shows , twice a day!). Whether you plan to see your local show or venture further afield to a see one of the big productions, you are guaranteed a noisy, fun filled show with so many great traditions maintained and enhanced.London Palladium (last year's GB Pantomime award winner (1500 seats plus) presentsSnow Whitefrom 8th December with a debut performance from Dawn French plus returning stars Julian Clary, Nigel Havers , Charlie Stemp (best leading male in 2018) and Gary Wilmot after their success last year. It promises to be the biggest pantomime spectacular of them all and expect more flying objects over the audience and risqué adult humour, most of which goes over children’s heads!Hackney Empire is another with a strong tradition of pantomime now celebrating its 20th anniversary production. This year it is Aladdin opening on 24th November with the wonderful Clive Rowe returning to the venue with Susie Mckenna directing and Steven Edis composing for their 20th show together.Woking has Paul Chuckle back with Craig Revel Horwood after the very sad death of his brother Barry Chuckle earlier this year. The legendary brothers won best double act last year's awards after 50 years of pantomime together and it is bound to be a poignant season for Paul and all his fans this year in Cinderella. It opens on 7th December.Up the A3 in Wimbledon, it's Aladdin with Paul Merton making his pantomime debut on 8th December as Widow Twankey with the magician Pete Firman. This grand venue is the home of GB Pantomime Awards whose awards show returns to the venue next April.Just across the Wimbledon Common at the wonderful Richmond Theatreis Peter Pan with another debutant Robert Lindsay as Captain Hook opening on 8thDecember. These smaller Victorian theatres (Frank Matcham built it in 1899) are the perfect intimate setting for traditional pantomime.The Salisbury Playhouse presents Beauty and Beast opening on 1stDecember. After the tragic incidents in the city over the last twelve months; it will surely be great to see the city buzzing with excitement over this year’s show. Last year's pantomime, Jack and the Beanstalk was the pantomime of the year (under 75O seats) at GB Panto Awards showing what can be achieved with a strong team ethic and a creative production team. It opens on 1stDecember.Birmingham Hippodrome offers Peter Pan from 19thDecember to 27thJanuary 2019 with seventies heartthrob Jimmy Osmond and comedian Matt Slack, who last year took the traditional songsheet to a new level when he dropped young Nicholas into the orchestra pit when he gave him some cheek. Expect spectacular effects with huge crocodiles and other magic from TwinFX.The Mayflower in Southampton presents Dick Whittington from 15th December in the newly redecorated venue. It has my favourite Dame Andrew Ryan and the wonderful Bobby Davro so expect some saucy laughs. No doubt the show will feature the fabulous double bus from TwinsFx flying again over the audience as it did last year in this title at the London Palladium.At Bath Theatre Royal is Peter Pan opening on 13th December with the veteran musical comedy star Paul Nicholas as Hook, local favourite Jon Monie who has really grown in stature over the years and with the hapless Nitwits as the crew.In Derby Arenait is Jack and the Beanstalkopening on 8thDecember with Duncan James as Jack and Lawrence Boothman (last year’s GB Pantomime best baddie award winner) as Cess Pitt. Last year it won Best Staging and Set at the awards and designer Morgan Brind stars as Dame Trot this year.In Manchester Opera houseis the most glittering and best known title Cinderellaopening on 8thDecember with Gareth Gates as Prince Charming and Les Dennis and Connor Mcintyre (from Coronation Street) as the Ugly sisters.York Theatre Royalpromises to be a very memorable and emotional year as it is expected to be Berwick Kaler last year as Dame after 39 seasons in the pantomine Grand Old Dameopening 13thDecember. This is a unique show in every way with people returning year after year on stage and in the audience and usually contains the most spectacular “slosh” scene you will see this season.Up in Scotland, the magnificent Elaine C Smith, the GB pantomime award winner for best Fairy, returns to the Glasgow Kings Theatre inAladdin as Widow Twankey from 1stDecember.And inBelfast Grand Opera House is Jack and the beanstalk from 1stDecemberwith Mary McFettridge as Dame Trot for her 29th year and the amazing David Bedella as Fleshcreep.If you want the old tradition of a female principle boy which sadly is less frequent these days then the Lighthouse Theatre Kettering has Aladdin with the lovely Lisa Mathieson in the title role and last year’s GB pantomime Award choreography winners Twist and Pulse as PC’s Hip and Hop.If you want to see the more unusual titles of Mother Goose you will need to go to the Theatre Severn in Shrewsbury from 28th November or Robinson Crusoe is at The Greenwich Theatre from 23rd November or Robin Hood at Milton Keynes (where Shane Ritchie repeats his success at Mayflower Southampton and Woking), Nottingham Playhouse and the Regent Theatre in Stoke (where Johnny Wilkes returns).There are hundreds of pantomimes around the country, most running for three or four weeks twice a day so there are plenty of opportunities to take the whole family for this special Christmas treat and you are guaranteed a lively fun time that I hope reminds everyone of the joy of live theatre.Pocket Size theatre will bring you reviews of some of the best British pantomimes this year.As November approaches the final preparations are under way for Pantomime across the country with the first show opening on 10th November at the Oldham Coliseum Theatre with Cinderella and running at some venues like the Theatre Royal Yorkuntil 2nd February 2019, and the anticipation grows for this fantastic family festive entertainment . It once again promises to be another brilliant season with the return of old favourites and some wonderful big names being signed up for their first Pantomimes ( hope there are ready for 50 plus shows , twice a day!). Whether you plan to see your local show or venture further afield to a see one of the big productions, you are guaranteed a noisy , fun filled show with so many great traditions maintained and enhanced.London Palladium (last year's GB Pantomime award winner (1500 seats plus) presentsSnow Whitefrom 8thDecember with a debut performance from Dawn French plus returning stars Julian Clary, Nigel Havers, Charlie Stemp (best leading male in 2018) and Gary Wilmot after their success last year. It promises to be the biggest pantomime spectacular of them all and expect more flying objects over the audience and risqué adult humour, most of which goes over children’s heads!Hackney Empireis another with a strong tradition of pantomime now celebrating its 20th anniversary production. This year it is Aladdin opening on 24th November with the wonderful Clive Rowe returning to the venue with Susie Mckenna directing and Steven Edis composing for their 20thshow together.Woking has Paul Chuckle back with Craig Revel Horwood after the very sad death of his brother Barry Chuckle earlier this year. The legendary brothers won best double act last year's awards after 50 years of pantomime together and it is bound to be a poignant season for Paul and all his fans this year in Cinderella. It opens on 7th December.Up the A3 in Wimbledon, it's Aladdin with Paul Merton making his pantomime debut on 8th December as Widow Twankey with the magician Pete Firman. This grand venue is the home of GB Pantomime Awards whose awards show returns to the venue next April.Just across the Wimbledon Common at the wonderful Richmond Theatre is Peter Panwith another debutant Robert Lindsay as Captain Hook opening on 8thDecember. These smaller Victorian theatres (Frank Matcham built it in 1899) are the perfect intimate setting for traditional pantomime.The Salisbury Playhouse presents Beauty and Beast opening on 1stDecember. After the tragic incidents in the city over the last twelve months; it will surely be great to see the city buzzing with excitement over this year’s show. Last year's pantomime, Jack and the Beanstalk was the pantomime of the year (under 75O seats) at GB Panto Awards showing what can be achieved with a strong team ethic and a creative production team. It opens on 1stDecember.Birmingham Hippodromeoffers Peter Pan from 19th December to 27th January 2019 with seventies heartthrob Jimmy Osmond and comedian Matt Slack, who last year took the traditional songsheet to a new level when he dropped young Nicholas into the orchestra pit when he gave him some cheek. Expect spectacular effects with huge crocodiles and other magic from TwinFX.The Mayflower in Southampton presents Dick Whittingtonfrom 15th December in the newly redecorated venue. It has my favourite Dame Andrew Ryan and the wonderful Bobby Davro so expect some saucy laughs. No doubt the show will feature the fabulous double bus from TwinsFx flying again over the audience as it did last year in this title at the London Palladium.AtBath Theatre Royalis Peter Pan opening on 13th December with the veteran musical comedy star Paul Nicholas as Hook, local favourite Jon Monie who has really grown in stature over the years and with the hapless Nitwits as the crew.In Derby Arenait is Jack and the Beanstalkopening on 8thDecember with Duncan James as Jack and Lawrence Boothman (last year’s GB Pantomime best baddie award winner) as Cess Pitt. Last year it won Best Staging and Set at the awards and designer Morgan Brind stars as Dame Trot this year.In Manchester Opera houseis the most glittering and best known title Cinderellaopening on 8thDecember with Gareth Gates as Prince Charming and Les Dennis and Connor Mcintyre (from Coronation Street) as the Ugly sisters.York Theatre Royalpromises to be a very memorable and emotional year as it is expected to be Berwick Kaler last year as Dame after 39 seasons in the pantomine Grand Old Dame opening 13th December. This is a unique show in every way with people returning year after year on stage and in the audience and usually contains the most spectacular “slosh” scene you will see this season.Up in Scotland, the magnificent Elaine C Smith, the GB pantomime award winner for best Fairy, returns to the Glasgow Kings Theatre inAladdin as Widow Twankey from 1stDecember.And in Belfast Grand Opera House is Jack and the beanstalk from 1stDecemberwith Mary McFettridge as Dame Trot for her 29th year and the amazing David Bedella as Fleshcreep.If you want the old tradition of a female principle boy which sadly is less frequent these days then the Lighthouse Theatre Kettering has Aladdin with the lovely Lisa Mathieson in the title role and last year’s GB pantomime Award choreography winners Twist and Pulse as PC’s Hip and Hop.If you want to see the more unusual titles of Mother Goose you will need to go to the Theatre Severn in Shrewsbury from 28th November or Robinson Crusoe is at The Greenwich Theatre from 23rd November or Robin Hood at Milton Keynes (where Shane Richie repeats his success at Mayflower Southampton and Woking), Nottingham Playhouse and the Regent Theatre in Stoke(where Johnny Wilkes returns).There are hundreds of pantomimes around the country, most running for three or four weeks twice a day so there are plenty of opportunities to take the whole family for this special Christmas treat and you are guaranteed a lively fun time that I hope reminds everyone of the joy of live theatre.Pocket Size theatre will bring you reviews of some of the best British pantomimes this year.Preview written by Nick Wayne
October 23, 2018
The Trench, first performed back in 2012, is in London for the first time – fittingly in time to commemorate 100 years since the end of the First World War.Les Enfant Terribles have become one of the most respected and innovative theatre companies in the UK, earning rave reviews, award nominations and selling over 90,000 tickets for their immersive Alice’s Adventures Underground and more recently, a sell-out run of the absurdist and brilliant Flies at the Edinburgh Fringe.This production carries many of the familiar hallmarks of a LET show; mesmerising puppetry, intricate set design and original music played live throughout and the cast of 5 are incredibly talented with newcomer James Hastings really shining as he glides effortlessly between a number of instruments. As with many of their other works, they do really well to create the world of the play and Samuel Wyer’s design is spot on for this show. The set offers the performers flexibility and space to weave in and out of the story and there are many flashes of beautiful movement throughout this 65 minute piece.Unfortunately despite the talented cast and beautiful original music by Alexander Wolfe, The Trench doesn’t have the same effect or impact as their previous work, which is surprising given the emotive and topical content of the piece. The show is based on the true story of Miner William Hackett and is told through an extended poem written by Artistic Director (and lead actor) Oliver Lansley. The lack of dialogue between the characters and the narrator like delivery makes it hard for the audience to fully engage and empathise with the central character and you end up being left more impressed by the devices used to tell the story than the content itself. For a one act production, there were some unexpected lulls in the pace and thisonly further highlighted the lack of investment and engagement with the story and characters. At the half way point, there was a beautiful moment between Hackett and young miner Thomas Collins which showed the development of their relationship effectively using mime and contemporary movement. This was utterly captivating and with more insight into the characters and their relationships this would have made The Trench a far more rewarding and moving experience.In the end this was a production of promise executed by a very strong and talented company but let down by an underdeveloped script which was lacking heart.Review by Andy Edmeads Rating: ★★★Price of Ticket: £20
October 18, 2018
Today (15 October 2018) Andrew Lloyd Webber with honoured artists Des O’Connor, Jimmy Tarbuck, Cliff Richard and Tommy Steele unveiled the Wall of Fame, a new art installation by Lee Simmons commissioned as part of the renovations to the Grade II listed facade of The London Palladium. Sited at the theatre’s world famous Stage Door on Great Marlborough Street, this ongoing installation is a permanent legacy to the many artists that have headlined at The London Palladium and will provide an intrinsic link between icons of the past and performers of the future. Further honoured artists depicted on the installation as chosen by an advisory committee of Don Black, Michael Grade and Laurie Mansfield are Arthur Askey, Ronnie Barker, Shirley Bassey, Jack Benny, Cilla Black, Max Bygraves, Nat King Cole, Ronnie Corbett, The Crazy Gang, Bing Crosby, Sammy Davis Jr, Ken Dodd, Gracie Fields, Bruce Forsyth, Judy Garland, Bob Hope, Tom Jones, Danny Kaye, Marie Lloyd, Vera Lynn, Liberace, Max Miller, Johnnie Ray, Tommy Trinder, Frankie Vaughan and Norman Wisdom.Andrew Lloyd Webber said “As part of the theatre’s ongoing refurbishment the opportunity arose to create a Wall of Fame and I am delighted that young artist Lee Simmons agreed to create what is a wonderful tribute to many of the Palladium’s performers throughout its 108 year history. The London Palladium is a very special theatre for me as it is to millions of people around the world and I hope that our new installation will give as much pleasure to locals and visitors to the West End as it has us.”Lee Simmons said “For this installation, I have been inspired by the history of the rich tapestry of performers that have graced the stage of The London Palladium. I have used stainless steel to create the portraits which have been cut using digital processes. My aim was to embrace the presence of the performers and capture an essence of the Palladium stars who have made the theatre what it is today.”An award-winning Royal College of Art graduate, Lee Simmons describes his work as a synthesis that brings together architecture, art and design and exploits the relationship between their blurred peripheries. Simmons is currently working on a number of high profile projects around the capital and his work can be found in both public and private collections. His recent commissions include a War Memorial for the City of Westminster.
October 15, 2018