Mustafa Shakir has made a splash as the new Big Bad in town in season 2 of . The actor takes on the role of John McIver, aka Bushmaster, a superpowered Jamaican gangster who not only gives Luke a run for his money in the strength and durability department, but is gunning for Mariah Dillard’s spot at the top of Harlem’s criminal food chain. Bushmaster’s gripe with Mariah is very personal, while his beef with Harlem’s Hero for Hire is more incidental — the bulletproof Cage is an obstacle in achieving his larger goal. While the character of Bushmaster is one of the more interesting and compelling to come out of Netflix’s corner of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, it’s the performance from Shakir that makes it worth watching. A veteran of film and television, Shakir has been in a number of great series as of late, like , , and. He also had a role in last year’s memorable Brawl in Cell Block 99 opposite Vince Vaughn. More: Shakir spoke with Screen Rant about his role in Luke Cage, his background in martial arts, and his understanding of Jamaican culture and the immigrant experience. Check out what he had to say below: Tell me a little bit about how you got involved in the the series and what appealed to you about the role."I went through the normal route, which was the managers and the agents. So I didn't really know what this guy was about at al;l I didn't know if he was superhuman or anything. I was just auditioning for Luke Cage. But once I found out, and found that it was Bushmaster, going through that whole Marvel process was pretty interesting and nerve-wracking but still very exciting. I just love the fact that he's other. He has an accent, he has all these peculiar qualities about him that just makes the part juicy and interesting to me. But the physicality of it really appealed to me. I want to spend the latter days of my life practicing martial arts and just let that be my full-time passion. So it's nice to be able to incorporate that into my love of acting and art. That was really cool."In addition to being one of the primary antagonists, what can you tell me about how Bushmaster fits into the seasons’ themes of family and legitimacy and everything else that’s going on?"Mariah is trying to distance herself from the name Stokes, and that directly connects her to someone who wants redemption because of what the Stokes have done to his family name. [Bushmaster] comes in as a counterpoint to Mariah's bottom line, which is good drama. It's all relative to family. My character is trying to avenge his family and Mariah's trying to legitimize hers and bring to rest many of the demons that haunt her. I guess collectively we're all dealing -- whether it's me, Mariah, Luke Cage -- we're all dealing with the demons of our bloodlines. So that convergence is pretty phenomenal. It wasn't even scripted the way that I have a monologue in episode 7 that is intertwined with Luke talking to his father in a church, and we're talking about the same things. I think that's a really great highlight. We're natural antagonists to what each other's bottom lines are."Your character has a unique fighting style that looks like capoeira. Is that about right? "Yeah, it's a little hybrid; you've got some capoeira moves. But it's like bush fighting. Capoeira comes out of a longer tradition of bush fighting. There's that, and there's a little bit of boxing in there. I have studied capoeira, though not extensively. Basically with the role being physical already it's just like -- I made the adjustment, cut some weight starting to stay light and lean, so I could move around and be squirrelly. Then you go and you learn the choreography. They teach you the moves and you film it, but then I go home and I practice those moves so it's in my muscle memory and it's all set when I do my thing."There are some pretty impressive fight sequences between you and Mike Colter. Tell me a bit about the process of putting together a compelling fight sequence, especially with the kind of choreography that was being used. How extensive of a process is that?"Not as extensive as you would think. We're all predisposed to being physical. Me and Mike move pretty well. We have help, he have doubles. Even if we do a fight sequence and it goes perfectly, the doubles do it too, so that, just in case, there are areas that they can cut between. In terms of preparation for it, we have like two-to-three hour training sessions where we learn the choreography and like I said, we tape it, and so you go home with the video and you just keep moving. And how much time you put into that is up to you. Me, I wanted to sell the movement, so I put a lot of time into it. I just really incorporated it into my workout so that when I got on set, we were't worrying about whether or not I knew it or could do it. We could just run through it."From your perspective, what goes into making a villain compelling? Is it important that the character see himself as the hero of his own story, or do you think that John McIver is more in touch with and accepting of who he is as an antagonist?"You hit it right on the head, when you said 'Hero of his own story.' That's the catchphrase I use. In his mind all of his pursuits are noble, so as a result, he feels justified. That justification, I feel like it lightens his character up a little bit. He feels like 'You guys are gonna catch on to what I'm talking about. You are asleep and I'm not.' So I think because he feels angry about the things that have happened to him, I feel like he is empowered by his decision to act in life in a way to bring about vindication as well as push his own agenda. I think with that comes his charisma and presence. Aside from nursing his desire to get rid of the Stokes, I think he's a cool guy [Laughs]."Let’s talk about playing a Jamaican gangster. For starters, how difficult was it to do the accent and how did you go about learning it? "Well I tell everybody, I've got a love of accents and I've been doing them my whole life. A Jamaican accent was one that was just in my pocket for a long time. It was kismet -- I had one other role back on a show called Wanted back in the day, maybe about eight years ago, maybe more. It's just cool to finally be able to use it. The way that I tweaked it was I just immersed myself in Jamaican culture, listening to the music, watching old documentaries. I think ultimately, I sort of fashioned that after Jimmy Cliff, and Usain Bolt has these interesting facial movements when he speaks. But more so than making specific to anybody I took it all in and let whatever came out come out."In terms of your process how do you work with the accent? How do you stay in that frame of mind? Do you find yourself thinking in that accent after a while? What do you do to maintain your grasp on an accent like that?"I wish I had a more complicated story or method. It's kind of on tap. Specifically it's a feeling. It's a feeling in your gut you can tap into once you've place it. Moving in and out of that place, I guess is what an artist is, so in that capacity I use what I love about working with accents or anything really, just switch on an off."What kind of research did you do or were you interested in doing to prepare for this role as a Jamaican immigrant?"The beauty of Harlem and New York being the backdrop is that it's so diverse and multicultural. There's like little villages, block to block, neighborhood to neighborhood, sometimes many in one neighborhood. I've had lots of interactions with the Caribbean diaspora, my sister dated a guy from the area. Back in the day, growing up in Harlem on 142nd Street and Hamilton it was little Jamaica; there's still some patty shops up there. I've had quite bit of experience with Caribbean people and their experiences with immigration. I've heard a lot of their stories. It's kind of next to home. My dad is Nigerian, so I have a sensitivity to the immigrant experience in and of itself."Next: Luke Cage season 2 is now streaming on Netflix. The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
As part of a series of Sunday marathons highlighting fan-favorite characters in , AMC is set to air ten episodes back-to-back that show the best of housewife-turned-zombie-killer Carol Peletier. Played by Melissa McBride, Carol started out as a mother who lived in fear of her violent and ill-tempered husband, but by the end of season 2 both her husband and her daughter, Sophia had been killed off.The search for Sophia marked the start of the close relationship between Carol and fellow survivor Daryl Dixon, who continued to look for Sophia on his own while the other characters focused on different priorities. The pain of losing her family caused Carol to develop a tougher persona, and she eventually became one of the fiercest fighters in the group.Related: The Carol marathon will begin on Sunday at 11am E.T., and these character-based marathons will continue in the coming weeks, with a Governor marathon on July 8, a Shane marathon on July 15, a Glenn marathon on July 22, and a Michonne marathon on July 29. The Shane marathon in particular may be worth checking out if you're eagerly anticipated more Walking Dead, as actor Jon Bernthal is set to .Highlights of the Carol marathon include the season 2 episode "Cherokee Rose," in which Carol and Daryl first begin to bond over their shared concern for the missing Sophia, and the season 4 episode "The Grove," in which Carol is forced to shoot a young girl, Lizzie, after her obsession with zombies leads her to murder her own sister. The scene in which Carol tearfully tells Lizzie to "look at the flowers" remains one of The Walking Dead's most memorable (and tragic) moments.Many fans feels that The Walking Dead has entered in recent seasons, as Rick and the rest of the group went to war with . But even if you stopped watching a while ago, it's worth tuning in for the marathon to see some of Carol's finest moments from the past eight years of The Walking Dead. Here's a full list of the episodes featured in the marathon:Season 2, Episode 4: "Cherokee Rose"Season 4, Episode 1: "30 Days Without An Incident"Season 4, Episode 4: "Indifference"Season 4, Episode 14: "The Grove"Season 5, Episode 1: "No Sanctuary"Season 5, Episode 13: "Forget"Season 6, Episode 15: "East"Season 6, Episode 16: "Last Day on Earth"Season 7, Episode 2: "The Well"Season 7, Episode 10: "New Best Friends"More: The Walking Dead season 9 is expected to premiere in fall 2019. The 'Best of Carol' marathon will air Sunday July 1st, starting at 11am E.T.Source: AMC (via ) The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
Evangeline Lilly has hinted that will include scenes featuring both Wasp and . She's suggesting that she built a friendship with actress Brie Larson over the course of the film, perhaps boding well for the franchise's future.Right now, Marvel is doing their level-best to keep every possible detail about Avengers 4 under wraps. They're even refusing to arguing that it's some sort of spoiler. The problem is, given filming on Avengers 4 wrapped up last year and there's a year to go, the stars have a year in which to slip up. Evangeline Lilly is currently doing the rounds promoting , but journalists are naturally also asking her about next year's Avengers movie. Although Lilly has already suggested , she still has a part of some kind - and it's likely more than just the single scene featuring .Related: In an interview with , Lilly suggested she and Brie Larson got to become friends over the course of filming. As Lilly put it:"You know what I was working, when I was working on Avengers I got to know Brie Larson pretty well, or as much as you can on a film, and her and I talked about it. And of course she’s going to be the next titled female superhero, she’s going to be Captain Marvel, and I’m sure this will be the beginning of many, many more titled Marvel films. Black Widow. Scarlet Witch. I mean I don’t know who’s next or who’s going to get a film, but it’s not, it’s just the beginning."There are really two takeaways from this. The first is that Lilly evidently spent a good bit of time on set with Larson, which really does make it seem as though the two characters share a few key scenes. These are two very important heroes in the MCU; they're the first two female heroes to star in their own MCU movies. Kevin Feige has suggested they're essentially the forerunners for a major change in the MCU, and he even envisions a time when .Secondly, it's worth noting that Marvel's actors seem to share Feige's view. Lilly stresses that Captain Marvel is "the beginning of many, many more titled Marvel films." Like Feige, she looks forward and imagines movies starring the female heroes. There's already a film in the works, for example, and Marvel's shortlist of directors for that movie is ; , Amma Asante, and Maggie Betts. Although Lilly insists she doesn't know what to expect for the future, she singles out Scarlet Witch as another possibility; herself doesn't seem too interested in the idea, though.Lilly's quote may be another subtle hint that Marvel is building up towards an movie. The studio seems to be investing a lot of time and effort into building up relationships between their female heroes; included that was generally seen as a teaser towards this idea. It would make sense for Captain Marvel to be a major part of this team, so setting up friendships with the other female heroes would be a wise move on Marvel's part.More: Source: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
CBS All Access sci-fi show continues to reshuffle its line-up of creatives, with Major Crimes creator James Duff joining the show as an executive producer. This follows the recent news that series showrunners Gretchen Berg and Aaron Harberts were removed from Discovery midway through season 2 after writers complained about them creating a hostile and abusive work environment, including an incident in which Harberts allegedly leaned over a table and yelled an expletive at another member of the show's staff.Executive producer and the show is currently undergoing a production hiatus, to give Kurtzman time to regroup the writing staff. Now it looks like he'll have some help when it comes to overseeing the rest of the season.Related: reports that Duff has joined Star Trek: Discovery as an executive producer, as part of a larger production deal that he has signed with CBS TV Studios. Moreover, some existing creatives have been promoted: consulting producer Jenny Lumet, who was recruited at the start of season 2, is now a co-executive producer; and co-executive producer Olatunde Osunsanmi has been promoted to executive producer and will also serve as director and producer on the show's set in Toronto.Star Trek: Discovery ended season 1 in an exciting place, with the Discovery receiving a distress call from none other than Captain Pike of the . Anson Mount () has joined the cast as Christopher Pike, who was played by Bruce Greenwood in the recent movies, and the second season will . Comedian as Denise Reno, the chief engineer of the USS Hiawatha.The problems with Discovery's second season were reportedly related to the hostile work environment, rather than any creative issues, so it seems like Duff (who also wrote the Star Trek: Enterprise episode "Fortunate Son") has been brought in as an experienced and steady hand to help the writers room recover from the earlier tumult. Between them, he and Kurtzman have plenty of experience producing and writing TV, so hopefully it will be smooth sailing from here, and the team will deliver a worthy second season of Discovery next year.More: Star Trek: Discovery's second season will premiere in 2019 on CBS All Access.Source: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
The first trailer for the upcoming Summer of ’84 is the latest example that the ongoing wave of ‘80s nostalgia isn’t anywhere close to being over. In what looks to be a mashup of recent ‘80s-set hits like and , the new film eschews the supernatural formula for something a little more grounded — serial killers. And while bike riding kids in a small town on the hunt for a local killer is a great hook for any movie, the trailer for Summer of ’84 is all about recreating a bygone era on the big screen.Written by Matt Leslie and Stephen J. Smith and directed by François Simard, Anouk Whissell, and Yoann-Karl Whissell, who collectively go by the name RKSS and previously directed Turbo Kid. The film heads down what is by now a familiar road, as a group of young friends, played by Graham Verchere, Judah Lewis, Caleb Emery, and Cory Gruter-Andrew pass the long days free from school and the concerns of adulthood hunting a local serial killer, dubbed “The Cape May Slayer.”More: As you can see from the trailer and the paranoia-inducing tones of its eerie synth-pop score, Summer of ’84 goes all-in on familiar character archetypes, starting with Verchere’s Davey Armstrong, the resident conspiracy theorist of the group and the one who is convinced local policeman Wayne Mackey (and 's Rich Sommer) is the killer in question. The rest of the group is similar in that regard as the other teens, along with Nikki Kaszuba (Tiera Skovbye) “scientifically the perfect woman,” are all fitted easily into archetypal slots. It will be interesting to see how audiences respond to the trailer — let alone the movie — in a post-Stranger Things world. That Summer of ’84 is going to be released in theaters later this summer probably would have been a factor in its corner had IT hadn’t made waves in theaters just about a year ago, utilizing many of the same tropes this film is so keen to make use of. So far, though, it doesn’t seem as though audiences are tiring of ‘80s nostalgia, as anticipation for season 3 of Stranger Things continues to be high, while . Whether that fondness for a decade will translate into Summer of ’84 becoming a hit or not remains to be seen, but with the film premiering this August, it won’t be long until the answer is known. Next: Summer of ’84 hits select theaters on August 10, 2018. Source: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
The Marvel Cinematic Universe has become a tremendous pillar of the movie industry. The MCU's movies have been steadily coming out for over a decade and they’ve made all sorts of other superhero and comic projects possible as a result.The popularity of superhero movies is nothing new, but what’s so special about the MCU is their nearly perfect track record.What these movies have done has become the new normal and a lot of the time it feels like Marvel’s reputation is as unblemished as Captain America’s shield. As a result, fans are hungry for more sequels and spin-offs, but it can be difficult to maintain quality control with so much out there.The truth of the matter is that the reason why so many Marvel projects are successful and of a higher quality is because there are just as many pitches that get shot down and extinguished before they get too far off the ground.Some of the major cancelations and changes in Marvel’s schedule have been public, but there are also many titles that most people have no idea came so close to reality.There’s a lot of attention focused on the Marvel movies that don’t come together, but the projects that are in the pipeline for television and even video games see just as interesting development cycles.Whether it’s a She-Hulk TV series or a Punisher video game, these ideas will unfortunately remain fascinating hypotheticals.Accordingly, here are the 30 Canceled Marvel Projects We Never Got To See. The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
Ending a television series after four seasons is “bittersweet,” according to star Aaron Stanford. The actor is just a week away from seeing his SYFY show reach its time-hopping conclusion as the four-week final season marathon marches toward the finish line. But while it’s always nice to be a part of a series that gets to tell a complete story from start to finish, Stanford says that there are other emotions that come along with it, and some of them might even creep into the actors’ performances. The chance to take part in a series finale is nothing new for Stanford. Before making the move to SYFY, he co-starred alongside Maggie Q on The CW’s for four seasons. Despite his familiarity with final seasons, Stanford’s experience is nevertheless a mix of emotions since, as he puts it, he’s “saying goodbye to [his] family.”More: Stanford talked about in a recent interview with Screen Rant, where he discussed the amount of time an actor spends with the crew and fellow cast members, and how bringing that to an end can be challenging. Stanford said:“It's bittersweet. Obviously you're always happy when you can tell a story completely from beginning to end, and tell it in a satisfying way where you're able to make yourself happy and make the audience happy. It's gratifying to be able to do something like that and see something through from beginning to end. On the bitter side, you're saying goodbye to your family. You know these are people that you work with and spend every day of the week for between 14 and 16 hours. You share your life with them, and it's tough when it comes to an end.”A sense of finality has been , particularly when James and Katarina (Barbara Sukowa) venture back to the beginning of their time travel adventure only to encounter themselves. Stanford says that feeling likely came through in the performances as a byproduct of the actors knowing they are working with one another for the last time. “What you're reading there is probably what we were projecting as people and as actors. There was a feeling, for me anyway, throughout the entire final season, there was that feeling every time we shot in a location where 'This is the last time we're gonna shoot here.' Or This is the last scene that I'm going to have with this person. Those things had a weight and a gravity to them. I think it just ended up coming across naturally in the performance. And I think it really works for the story, but it was a pretty natural process.”Next: 12 Monkeys concludes next Friday with ‘The Beginning: Parts 1 & 2’ on SYFY. The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
fans who were disappointed by Luke Skywalker in - we've got some good news. No, to address online controversies, since that would be ridiculous. But Luke's combat skills compared to Rey's are being given a bit more credit.How a rookie lightsaber user like Rey could actually get the better of "the last Jedi Knight" in a fight is one of the most oft-cited criticisms among those who dislike director Rian Johnson's addition to the Star Wars series. And while the comic book adaptation of the movie doesn't give the victory to Luke... it does highlight the REAL reason he ended up on his back.We'll let fans decide if it eases the disappointment.Related: Already, the comic book adaptation of The Last Jedi has shed new light and storytelling on key moments of the film. Aside from - he was unceremoniously killed in the final cut of the film - the comic also showed . The goal of writer Gary Whitta is clearly not to alter, improve, or re-contextualize the events of Rian Johnson's film. Instead, add another voice those who worked to bring the story to the audience.In the case of the night Luke Skywalker finally took a stand against Rey, and refused to believe Ben Solo could be saved, it seems the rain was a bigger factor than movie audiences might realize. The film showed Luke swiping Rey's staff from her before she Force-grabbed his lightsaber and forced him onto the flat of his back. The comic book, given a bit more time to flesh out the sequence of events, makes one important change.See if you can spot it:That's right, according to that one little panel from artist Michael Walsh, Luke Skywalker ends up on his back due specifically to a slip, not Rey's supremacy in staff-to-staff combat (the literal "SLIP" caption makes it undisputable). Ordinarily, this would seem like a small detail. But in the larger story of Star Wars - and even more importantly, the events in the main Episode films - no single scene or moment is ever overlooked by fans. Fans who may now have a fresh controversy where opinions of Rey and Luke's battle are concerned.The moment may not have the same 'sizzle' as the question of , but those rolling their eyes should be careful. For some, this moment in Last Jedi was a powerful one, demonstrating just how far along or how powerful in The Force Rey had become. The scenes that follow could even be seen as supporting that idea, as Rey goes off to save the day, leaving Luke and Yoda to consider the reality of their time now passing to a new generation.The idea that with no formal training, Rey was now capable - through either skill or sheer willpower - to best Luke seemed laughable to the other side of the argument. And all things considered, this evidence may tip the scales. It seems Rey now benefited from Luke's age, or questionable footing, if anything.Think this will settle the debate?Star Wars: The Last Jedi Adaptation #4 will be available July 4th, from .MORE: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
The release of is right around the corner (well, ), and to celebrate Hot Toys has unveiled 1/6 scale collectible figures of Scott Lang as Ant-Man and Hope van Dyne as The Wasp. Directed by Peyton Reed, Ant-Man and the Wasp sees its titular heroes going on a rescue mission to try and find Hope's mother, Janet van Dyne, , while also dealing with the new threat of a .Although we saw the Wasp costume in Ant-Man's post-credits scene, this movie marks the first time we'll actually see it in action - which, for Disney, means another golden merchandising opportunity. We can probably expect to see all sorts of Wasp toys on sale soon enough, but Hot Toys' sculpts are among the most highly-anticipated collectibles because of the level of detail that goes into the builds.Related: One week out from Ant-Man and the Wasp's release, Hot Toys (via ) has released images of its tie-in collectible figures of Scott and Hope in their superhero costumes. The figures are 1/6 scale (though they were presumably modelled in full size and then shrunk down to 1/6 scale using Hank Pym's shrinking technology), and the Wasp figure includes interchangeable head options, so you can choose between Wasp's full costume with helmet, and a highly detailed sculpt of Evangeline Lilly in the role. Check out some images of the collectible figures below, along with details of their features and accessories.The 1/6th scale The Wasp Collectible Figure specially features:Authentic and detailed likeness of Wasp in Ant-ManOne (1) newly developed head sculpt with authentic likeness of Evangeline Lilly as Hope Van DyneOne (1) newly developed helmeted head sculpt with LED light-up function (battery operated)Movie-accurate facial expression with skin texture and make-upNewly developed body with over 28 points of articulationsApproximately 29 cm tallTwo (2) pairs of interchangeable Wasp’ wings including:One (1) pair of articulated wingsOne (1) pair of stand by wingsSeven (7) pieces of interchangeable gloved hands including:One (1) pair of fistsOne (1) pair of relaxed handsOne (1) pair of gesturing handsOne (1) left hand for holding disc equipmentEach piece of head sculpt is specially hand-paintedCostume:One (1) metallic dark blue and brass-colored Wasp suit with embossed patterns, red-colored trims, and weathering effectsOne (1) pair of dark blue-colored bootsAccessories:One (1) attachable opened helmet accessoryOne (1) miniature Wasp with stand (Approximately 2.9cm tall)Two (2) disc equipmentSpecially-designed dynamic figure stand with movie logo, character nameplate and a character backdropThe 1/6th scale Ant-Man Collectible Figure specially features:Authentic and detailed likeness of Ant-Man in Ant-ManOne (1) newly developed head sculpt with authentic likeness of Paul Rudd as Scott LangOne (1) newly developed helmeted head sculpt with LED light-up function (battery operated)Movie-accurate facial expression with detailed wrinkles, and skin textureBody with over 30 points of articulationsApproximately 30 cm tallSix (6) pieces of interchangeable gloved hands including:One (1) pair of fistsOne (1) pair of open handsOne (1) left hand for holding disc equipmentOne (1) gesturing right handEach piece of head sculpt is specially hand-paintedCostume:One (1) metallic red and black-colored Ant-Man suit with embossed patterns, silver colored trims, and weathering effectsOne (1) silver-colored Ant-Man particle beltOne (1) pair of black-colored bootsAccessories:One (1) miniature Ant-Man (Approximately 2.7cm tall)One (1) shrunken labOne (1) attachable opened helmet accessoryTwo (2) disc equipmentSpecially-designed figure stand with movie logo, character nameplate and a character backdropA price point for the figures has not yet been revealed, but you can probably expect them to set you back at least a couple of hundred dollars apiece, based on the price of other Marvel Hot Toys collectibles.Now if only we could convince them to make a collectible figure for that More: Source: (via ) The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
Despite roaring out of the gate last Friday, dinosaur sequel has suffered a massive box office drop in weekend two. Considering that the first film is one of the highest-grossing films in history - #5 on the chart with nearly $1.7 billion, right behind - it was absolutely fair for observers to expect the same type of box office dominance from its sequel. Unfortunately, that might not end up being the case.Now, that's not to say that Fallen Kingdom is doing poorly overall, because it most certainly isn't. The film crushed the box office during its domestic opening weekend, A sky-high international sales total has so far added on over $600 million to that haul, leading to a That's definitely an impressive stat, but it's also telling, as Fallen Kingdom's domestic opening was down nearly 30% from its predecessor. might help shore up Fallen Kingdom in the end, but the chances of it equaling or surpassing Jurassic World's $652 million domestic take are looking slim.Related: Now, has tweeted out a surprising fact: Fallen Kingdom only earned $17.4 million on Friday. That's a staggering 71% drop from last week's Friday total of $58.5 million. While this kind of huge drop does sometimes happen - for example, sustained an enormous 77% Friday-to-Friday drop in May - it's definitely not encouraging.While Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is still projected to easily take #1 again domestically this weekend - with a total of around $60 million - that's also not really an encouraging stat overall. Assuming the projections hold out, that'll be a 59% weekend-to-weekend drop, much higher than the first Jurassic World's 49% drop from weekend one to weekend two. Things start to look even worse when one considers that Jurassic World's domestic opening weekend take was $208 million, much higher than Fallen Kingdom's domestic opening. All in all, while high overseas grosses will likely once again lift Universal's sequel well over the $1 billion mark, Fallen Kingdom will probably come up short of topping Jurassic World's worldwide take as well.A couple of factors that likely contributed to Fallen Kingdom's second weekend plunge are that it's pre-July 4 weekend in the states, and that the sequel's While the actual July 4 holiday isn't until Wednesday, lots of Americans are already on vacation for the event, and this would be far from the first time that said exodus led to an underwhelming weekend for the box office. Still, that's hardly a rule, as many films have done well around the holiday. On the critical side, Fallen Kingdom earned a 51% on Rotten Tomatoes, much lower than Jurassic World's 71% score. Thus, it's definitely possible that many who hesitated to see the film opening weekend ended up One wonders what this downward trend for the franchise means for 2021's More: Source: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
Warning: SPOILERS ahead for GLOW Season 2-In season 2, the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling must wrestle their hearts out and put on an unforgettable show to keep from being canceled. This leads to a set up for season 3 that will spark excitement for longtime fans of the original GLOW from the 1980s. In short, the GLOW girls are headed to Las Vegas - the birthplace and home base of the real-life GLOW!Netflix's hit series picks up from where season 1 left off: after a short hiatus, the ragtag troupe of pro wrestlers come back for a new season and are urged to become better in the ring. They put their bodies on the line to improve the quality of their matches, only to learn that their series is in on the verge of cancelation. Meanwhile, the GLOW girls themselves deal with various personal issues - especially the two stars of the series, Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie) and Debbie Egan (Betty Gilpin), whose volatile friendship comes to a head violently in the ring.Related: In the end, season 2 introduced a huge change to GLOW and to the lives of their heroic group of performers and producers. Here's how GLOW season 2 upended the show to bring the series to Las Vegas in season 3:This Page: How Season 2 Sets Up Season 3Page 2: HOW GLOW SEASON 2 SET UPS SEASON 3Upon returning from hiatus and trying to raise their game to put on more believable wrestling matches, the GLOW girls suffer a huge setback. The show's sponsor, Patio Town, pulls their support because Debbie/Liberty Belle broke their patio furniture in her championship rematch with Tammé/Welfare Queen (Kia Stevens). Even more damaging, despite their small but loyal fanbase of regulars who attend their TV tapings, KD-TV, the local network that owns the series, relegated GLOW to 2 am on Saturday nights - a timeslot that means certain death. GLOW's solution is to work harder and put on even zanier shows, but their efforts to boost ratings were in vain.Bash (Chris Lowell), GLOW's enthusiastic millionaire backer, and Debbie, now a producer, try to finagle new sponsorships to take GLOW national through syndication. But it was Sam (Marc Maron), GLOW's acerbic director, who inadvertently made the pivotal contact that saved his show: while he and Ruth chaperoned the school dance of his daughter Justine (Britt Baron), Sam met Ray (Horatio Sanz), the owner of a chain of local strip clubs. Ray accepted Sam's invitation to watch the GLOW series finale, which featured the real-life wedding of Rhonda/Brittania (Kate Nash), who needed to actually marry an American to get a green card and not be sent back home to the UK. Bash and Debbie invited potential new sponsors to the show as well, but they were all shocked to learn that because of the contracts they signed, KD-TV owns the rights to all of their characters and prevented them from selling GLOW to another network. GLOW as a TV series is over.However, Ray loved the show and saved GLOW. Instead of a TV series, Ray offered them a slot at one of his clubs in Las Vegas, which needed a live headlining act - something he felt GLOW would be perfect for. Instead of the ratty warehouse that they remodeled to look like the ballroom of a fancy hotel, GLOW will now present their show in a huge space with room for 1,100 screaming fans, and they would earn $25,000 as Vegas headliners. GLOW may no longer be a TV series, but they're moving on up. What's more, the Riviera Hotel and Casino in Vegas is where the 1980s GLOW was filmed, so it means Netflix's GLOW is 'coming home' in season 3.Page 2: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
Jon Kasdan confirms he's writing the script for Steven Spielberg's in a new tweet. Earlier this week, it was reported that Kasdan, who co-wrote this summer's with his father, Lawrence Kasdan, was hired to for Lucasfilm, thus meaning that the movie may not make its planned release date.The fifth installment in the series was originally expected to release in 2020 but expected to be delayed amid news that screenwriter David Koepp has been replaced by Kasdan, who is now re-writing the film’s much-anticipated screenplay. Should the movie be released in 2021 instead, it will mark 40 years since Raiders of the Lost Ark - the first movie in the franchise - released in 1981. Perhaps that's the way Disney/Lucasfilm wants it.Related: Shortly after news broke that Kasdan would be writing the script, a Twitter user asked the screenwriter if it was true or not. Kasdan’s reply was pure gold as he used a quote from Raiders to make his point, explaining that Lucasfilm has “top men” working on the screenplay. Fans may recognize the quote from the end of the film, as Indy inquires about what was to be come of the Ark of the Covenant. Major Eaton replies that they have “top men working on it." Take a look:It is somewhat fitting that Jonathan Kasdan is following in the footsteps of his father, Lawrence, seeing as his father not only wrote the screenplays for The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, but also for Raiders of the Lost Ark. And seeing the story Jonathan turned in for Solo: A Star Wars Story perhaps convinced Lucasfilm to hand the script's reins over to him. After all, he already has some experience writing for another one of Harrison Ford's iconic characters. What's more, Koepp wrote the script for Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, and that didn't turn out the way the studio wanted. This is a good way to get a fresh set of eyes on the franchise - and the character, for that matter - before potentially calling it quits altogether.At the moment, it's unclear which direction the story will take, plot-wise and whether or not it will conclude or set up the future of the franchise. This might very well be Ford's last movie, considering his age and how long these films take to develop, so Kasdan may either try to bring Indy's story to a fitting end or lay the foundation for another actor/character to continue the saga down the line.More: Source: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
Microsoft and Sony have pulled the curtain on July 2018's free games for Live's Games with Gold and Plus members. Every month, premium members of Xbox Live and PlayStation Plus are privy to a host of free games on their favorite consoles, ranging from indie titles to triple-A releases.The quality of free releases tends to fluctuate but every now and then, they give players a gem as a little bonus for maintaining a premium membership. Some examples of those times both platforms have been particularly kind to players include April 2015 when Xbox Live offered the classic pirate adventure and even just this June, Sony let players have .Related: This coming July, Xbox Live Gold members will get twin-stick shooter Assault Android Cactus and Death Squared, a multiplayer co-op brain teaser by SMG for Xbox One on July 1 and July 16, respectively. For Xbox 360, players can enjoy Virtual Fighter 5: Final Showdown from July 1 and on July 16; it's the sixth of eight installments in the series released back in 2010. PlayStation Plus users, on the other hand, will be getting martial arts RPG Absolver and choice-based noir thriller for free on the PS4 on July 1. PS3 players will receive Rayman 3 HD and Deception IV: The Nightmare Princess, with PS Vita players getting Space Overlords and Zero Escape: Zero Time Dilemma.While most of these games will be coming on July 1, players who haven’t yet taken advantage of June’s free games can still do so for a limited time. Right now, LEGO Indiana Jones 2 is still available on both Xbox consoles. Assassin’s Creed Chronicles: Russia is still available on Xbox One as well as Smite, which can still be downloaded until July 15. PlayStation Plus is still offering Squares and Atomic Ninjas on Vita, Zombie Driver HD: Complete Edition and Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Future Soldier on PS3, and Trials Fusion and XCOM 2 on PS4 until July 3, with Call of Duty: Black Ops III being available until July 11.It's always great for players to receive free games, but these titles are chosen at random. It's possible that Heavy Rain is releasing this month because many PS4 players have just finished playing , the latest title from developer Quantic Dream. Plus, Black Ops 3 being available longer most likely has something to do with Sony having a marketing partnership with Activision for this year's . Unfortunately, since Ubisoft never announced a , there's no real reason for Xbox to add Conviction to their lineup next month. But, who knows, perhaps the following month may have more to say.More: Source: , The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
DC's series should share continuity with the DCEU. One of the most eagerly-anticipated shows to launch on the DC Universe streaming service, Titans is absolutely full of potential. The series stars a number of second-tier superheroes who have massive fanbases - characters like Robin, Beast Boy, and Wonder Girl. The episodic format is ideally suited to develop these characters, and the have teased a dark, comic accurate rendition.Traditionally, Warner Bros. has kept their TV shows separate from their film universe. The bulk of the popular DCTV shows are set in the so-called "," and in theory this allows DCTV freedom to maneuver, not having to consider the latest big-screen developments. It's a matter of opinion whether or not that works, but it's frankly time for it to change.Related: While it's fine for most of the DCTV shows to be set in their own pocket universe, there's no reason DC couldn't use some series to further develop the DC Extended Universe. As the first show to hit DC Universe Titans should also be the first TV series to be explicitly set in the same universe as the movies.This Page: The Story and Aesthetics are a Great MatchNext Page: The Story and Aesthetics are a Great MatchThe first reason is the most obvious - the aesthetic matches perfectly. up are absolutely gorgeous. It's a fantastic modernized approach, blending the traditional design with real-world clothing and even armor. Combined with a dark color scheme, it creates a sense that this Robin is a soldier in the war against crime, and - just like his mentor - he's most comfortable in the shadows. Thwaites's facial expressions carry a sense of intensity to them, as though this Robin is something of a driven man. While the series is sure to capitalize on the sense of hope and optimism that should always be central to the Titans mythos, it's clear this optimism is in the face of a very dark world indeed.This aesthetic dovetails perfectly with the DCEU to date, particularly as developed by Zack Snyder. Snyder inroduced the DCEU as a dark and dangerous place, and while the franchise as a whole seems to have pivoted away from that, Gotham itself surely won't get much brighter. If any location in the DCEU is destined to remain dark, it's Gotham. The city whose greatest hero dons the cowl of the bat. The Titans series looks as though it would gel perfectly with that incarnation of Gotham City.Related: It's important to note that, in terms of continuity, there's no reason this should be an issue. revealed that a Robin had paid the ultimate price, dying in battle against the Joker. Although there's evidence , it's officially been retconned into becoming . Of course, as any comic book fan knows, Todd didn't stay dead; he was resurrected by Batman's enemies and returned as the Red Hood. in Titans. That means both Batman V Superman and Titans could assume an almost identical backstory; that Batman has had Robins, and that one of them was killed by the Joker.Page 2 of 2: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
Having three films per year allows Marvel Studios to continue expanding their brand by introducing new franchises without compromising their established properties. Superhero movies and franchises are currently the bread and butter of Hollywood. And, while over the last few years, other companies have attempted to set-up their own cinematic franchises, Marvel Studios remains on the top spot. With a brand new chapter set to begin for the MCU after next year's , the famed cinematic universe is showing no signs of slowing down producing three movies annually.Upping their movie production from two to three projects last year with Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, and Thor: Ragnarok, 2018 is only the second year to the follow this new establishing the new quota. Apparently, more than just wanting to increase their yearly turn-out, there's actually a deeper logic for this decision.Related: Speaking with , Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige explained how the three movies per year arrangement allows the MCU to introduce new franchises without the risk of forgetting about their existing ones."It's one of the reasons we've expanded to three films a year, is so that we could do the sequels to films that people have responded to -- because we love to make continuing stories with characters people have responded to -- but also keep doing the stuff that nobody's ever heard of, and people go, 'Why are you doing that?' That's fun. And that's what Phase One was built on, Phase Two was built on, Phase Three was built on, is having that... Whenever we announce the next year, two years, three years, five years, whatever we're going to announce, there will be plenty of those that, maybe people in the know like yourself will know what they are, but the world at large will go, 'What is it? Why are they doing that?' That's exciting, for sure."When you've got, what is it now, six, seven separate franchises? It's part of the scheduling process. Sometimes when people ask, 'What about this character, what about that character?' I go, 'Well, it's scheduling.' And they go, 'What's he talking about?' Scheduling. How many years between movies can you have? You know, [Thor:] Ragnarok was four years. There's four years between, right? He had an appearance in between there. So that seems to be maybe okay - sometimes, though, you want it to be less. Sometimes it can be more."Often overlooked, Marvel Studios' scheduling scheme is actually a huge a factor in the MCU's success as it allows all sub-properties to develop without leaving any of them behind. This is why event movies like the Avenger films continue to be exciting as it serves as mini-culminating events that reunite all heroes and introduce them to new ones after they all finish their own respective missions.While some may argue that having three superhero films a year from a single studio might be an overkill, which could result in fatigue, the franchise attempts to combat that by switching things up in terms of genre. As examples, Captain America: The Winter Soldier was a political thriller movie, Ant-Man was a heist film, Ragnarok was an intergalactic road trip, was a mix of political and family drama, and Homecoming was a coming-of-age story.As the company's third and final movie of the year, , inches near, it's almost hard to believe that the Disney subsidiary already has two smash hits in Black Panther and Avengers: Infinity War with still six months left in 2018. But fans can expect that this scheduling will continue to be the case moving to MCU's Phase 4 with three more flicks already on the docket for next year: , Avengers 4 and Spider-Man: Far From Home.More: Source: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018
Trent Luckinbill is an American producer and lawyer. Trent, his twin brother Thad, and producer Molly Smith, started the production company Black Label Media in 2013. The films he has produced include The Good Lie, Sicario, , and . He recently produced , the sequel to the critically acclaimed Sicario.Screen Rant sat down with Trent and talked about the origins of the sequel, the director Stefano Sollima, the film’s theme on immigration, cutting down the films length, the risks of a franchise, plans for a third film, making a great film versus a political statement, and what the actors brought to the characters.Trent: Get down there, it was like. First of all, Benicio has a massive fan base. Latin America, he's like their guy. And then, but Josh, with all his movies, you know, just recently come out. It's like, you know, you had all of Thanos gloves.SR: The summer of Brolin.Trent: Summer of, right.SR: So, first of all, congratulations on the film. I enjoyed it. You actually did one of my other favorite films this year, 12 Strong. I loved it.Trent: Oh yeah, yeah, we were proud of that one.SR: I love it a lot. That's a really good film.Trent: Fuglsig with Bruckheimer. We had a good time on that one.SR: So, the first film. I went back and watched it again and it's so intense. And this one also, the same thing. I was like gripping my chair. In that scene with that, when they go into the Target or whatever. It is, it's intense. It's real intense. So, I have to ask, what I mean. Because I know that the sequel was kind of announced, almost right after the first film. So how did you know what the story was going to be? Was this always part of the plan?Trent: No. I mean it was Taylor Sheridan who wrote it. He always said as we were making the movie. He always had ideas where this could go. But he wrote it as a single picture. And we obviously didn't leave it teed off plot to go into a second. But I think we always thought if we had the of response for these characters, and for the movie, and certainly it overwhelmed us how much responses we got critically. And then even after the box office, the fans that found the movie, it was really impressive. But we always thought we'd love to see more. And we'd love to follow these characters in their world and see where they go. And so, there was a lot of seeds planted early on. And then when it had the response, we talked to the Denis. Taylor was ready to go. He had ideas for a second. So that's kind of how it happened. But we always thought there's more, there's more to see.SR: It's interesting because I randomly was watching a documentary on Vice about drug cartels and coyotes.Trent: Is that The Trade?SR: Yeah, it was amazing.Trent: It really was.SR: The first Sicario really speaks a lot about the drug side of this. This is more about the immigration side, which I also find just as intriguing. When did you know that that was going to be the direction of this film?Trent: Honestly. I think Taylor is such a brilliant writer. A guy like that and you know, obviously he wrote Sicario, Comancheria, which is Hell or High Water. And then Wind River. All on spec. In a row. So, it was, I guess, thematic trilogy. I think, we've come to understand that he just has such a cool vision. And it’s just sort of abnormal in a way. Like the way he constructs his scripts and all that. That we literally were like, “Go do all these ideas in your head, put them down on paper. We know it's going to be great and we're not going to bother you.” Kind of, in a way. And so, this was something I think. He comes from Texas and I think he has family that are in law enforcement, whatever. I think these are issues that he just understands. And it's constantly has an eye on. So, some of these things, I think were ideas that he pulled from reality. And to focus on the immigration I think was an idea about how to sort of look at what's going on the border. And what could potentially happen and things like that.SR: Denis did the first film. And did it brilliantly. And Stefano, man, I felt like this film was made for him. You know what I mean? He did such a good job. What went into picking him as the director?Trent: The biggest criteria we had was, because Denis is so good holding tension. We knew part of the DNA of the first movie, it was just people. We never let them up. Like you said, like you never let go of the chair. So, we literally, once we knew Denis schedule was going to be a conflict. And we were like, “We got to find somebody that can hold tension like Denis.” So that's kind of how we started our search. And we all sort of knew Stefano through different avenues and different projects around town. And loved his work. And once we really drilled in on like really what he did in Gomorrah and Suburra. We were like, “Oh yeah, you know what, this guy's, he's got some of the same characteristics.” So, we were thrilled that worked out. And he delivered on that. Because we feel like it is just as tense as the first one.SR: Right, and I know he's doing Call of Duty next now. It's making me think, “Oh, I can't imagine what he's going to do with that franchise.”Trent: Oh yeah, yeah, yeah.SR: One thing that is really interesting to me is that more particular now is that in the last couple of years, with the current administration that's going on, immigration has been such a big thing. What do you want people to take away from Sicario 2?Trent: From an immigration standpoint?SR: Yes. And the drug trafficking as well.Trent: Ours is inspired by things that are going on certainly. In the first one we did a really good job of, and we tried really hard to show both sides. Right? Not to make any commentary on it, but to actually say, “There's great people and bad people on both sides of the border and this is affecting good people and bad people, or good people on both sides of the border. So, you had that cop who was really dirty in the first one, but he just was trying to do what he needed to do. But he got caught up in it. And then you had, in this one, you see people along the way that are living in fear and affected by what's going.SR: And circumstances.Trent: Yeah, exactly. So, I think our idea was just to focus on, cartels aren't Mexico by any stretch of the imagination.SR: Oh absolutely.Trent: And we wanted to make sure, that people understand that we're not saying anything like that. We're focused on what the effects and the consequences of drug trade. And the effects and consequences of trying to combat that. And obviously our guys sort of go off the rail with their approach. And so, I think that's really sort of where we wanted to land. And sort of straddle that line and just show it.SR: And it's also interesting too, because United States government in this film, they have their hands dirty as well. So, one thing that I kind of really like about this film is that you guys do show different sides of every situation. And Stefano was telling me earlier that the original draft of the script was very large, and it was scaled down. Why was it scaled down to what we got? And how big was it originally?Trent: You mean plot wise?SR: Yes.Trent: Yeah, it was. I think we… I'm just trying to think about what his comment would’ve meant. It was certainly a longer movie, which is always a struggle in filmmaking. So, we wanted to make sure we hit that two-hour mark, roughly. But it was also, we wanted, the plot was big. And there were other twists in there that we thought pulled, I think probably pulled away from our characters. And what you love about this one was. The first one you saw Benicio’s character halfway through the movie. And you're like, “Who is this dude? Someone mysterious.” And then Matt just comes in ready and confident and he's executing the plan. For the most part the plan went according to Matt’s original scheme.But in this one I think it's about you actually know the characters. You know their dynamic between each other. So now you're focusing on them. And you get to kind of get in their head a little bit more and see their decision making, the consequences. You see that morality tested not just once. You see Josh, and they're actually presented with the same question, right? Which is “How do you know?” It's not just Alejandro got to defy orders in order to save dudes, do right by this girl. It's also Brolin going like, “I have to defy orders to do right by my buddy.” He's making decision to sacrifice for his friend. Alejandro is making a decision to sacrifice for the girl. So, we liked that. We wanted to spend enough real estate on that. And so, I don't think we took a lot out. But it was probably just some small plot things that would have eaten up too much time.SR: What did you learn from the first film to the second film that either carried over or you were like, “Well, you know what, that, producing wise, didn't necessarily work on the first. Let's try to change this up for the second one.”Trent: Gosh, honestly, it was the other way around. We were like so focused on… Because we all loved the first one so much. We just wanted to make sure we did right by it. And that people in the audience felt like this was a distinct movie and it could stand alone. Which we feel like it can.SR: Absolutely. That's what I loved about this movie actually. I did see the first film, but I didn't have to see it first film to enjoy this film.Trent: Yeah. We've tried to stress that in marketing. Because it's true. You can walk in and see this movie and not have seen the first one to love it and get it. And then you want to go back and watch the first one. But we just felt like we had built such great characters and such a great world that we wanted it to be different enough, but also be true too, for the fans and the audience. I think it's like anytime you're dealing with sequels and in a franchise. I think everybody struggles with that. Because you depart too much and all of a sudden they're like,”You messed it up.” But also, our company Black Label, we really sort of gravitate towards these, kind of, prestige commercial intersection. And we felt like the DNA of the first one was so prestigious. And that we had to make sure that it lived up to that. So it was kind of more of a guiding light, then it was trying to like differentiate too much.SR: Stefano (Sollima, the director) was telling me earlier that Mr. Sheridan (the writer) had a plan for a three chapter story with the Sicario franchise. So, can we expect a Sicario 3?Trent Luckinbill: Absolutely.SR: Perfect.Trent Luckinbill: We were so thrilled that people responded to the first one. And we felt justified in making a second. Because we loved it. We were probably the biggest fans of the movie. And we feel that way again. And obviously we've, even more than the first one, we kind of teed up a little teaser. We would love to kind of see… Look, this was always in the back of Taylor's mind and we loved it. And we thought, “God, it would be great if we could get there.” And I think we’d like to do that now. I certainly feel like the second one lived up to the expectations.SR: So many people nowadays are consumed by media, whether it be television or films. And I don't want to say less research, but I don't think a lot of people, general mass population do a ton of research on certain things. Do you hope this shines the light on current world events that are actually happening right now?Trent: Yeah. I mean, I think it's just a reflection, a little bit, of current events. I mean, it's like I said, it's not a commentary. So, I don't think we're… Certainly, there are a lot of complicated issues in immigration. With all, with administrations and countries and all of that. And it's something that we've dealt with in the past and continue to deal with as a country. But I think we were just inspired. As this film, as a plot driver. Because it's relevant and it's important and it's real. But we weren’t taking, and don't want to take, a political position on anything. It's not, that's just not... To us, that's not really necessarily a great movie. That’s not a movie we want to make. We just liked to explore the world a little bit.SR: When it comes to hitmen, where do you rank Alejandro compared to everybody else?Trent: He's the baddest.SR: He's… I know.Trent: How about that double handed trigger shot.SR: It was amazing.Trent: That was all his idea.SR: Oh really?Trent. Yeah, yeah, yeah. He said, “I want to try something.” And then he walked up and did that. And we were like, “Whoa, that's amazing.”SR: I always see those memes of like, “Who would you want protecting you?” I would totally put my trust in Alejandro.Trent: Oh, yeah. He’s so calm and his approach is very assured.SR: Yeah. You spoke a little bit about Benicio when you said you were in Mexico City recently?Trent: Yeah, we just got back with.SR: What did the actors actually bring to the characters that may have not been on the page?Trent: Oh God, that's a really good question. Because there's a lot. I think Brolin really, in the first one, found that character. He made more of the character then was on the page. Just confidence in the first one. The humor and all of that. This one really asked them to find that dilemma, the morality. To expose that in a way. Benicio knows that character really well. When we're making the movie, he's very clear on what he wants to do with it and limitations or whatever it is. So, he's constantly coming in and making sure that we're all on the same page with what Alejandro is going to do in the scene. And he's always right. And the… Oh, I'll give you a great point. Alejandro, he brought the whole death thing. That’s really powerful, was an idea from Benicio. That was not in the script.SR: And that was also a great tonal shift from the isolation of the desert. Amazing. Well, congratulations man. Thank you so much. That was amazing.Trent: Yeah, no, thank you.MORE: The post appeared first on
June 30, 2018